How To Carry Extra Fuel On A Dirt Bike (What You Need To Know)

How To Carry Extra Fuel On A Dirt Bike (What You Need To Know)

We’ve all been there before, those times when you want to continue your ride but you’re running out of fuel. This is exactly why everyone needs to carry extra fuel with them when they’re going out to ride the trails.

There are a couple of things that I personally do for carrying extra fuel, but if you want, you can become more creative than that and actually do it another way. However, it’s essential to use a method that is safe, because you know, we’re talking about fuel.

The option that I like the most for carrying fuel safely is fuel bottles, or getting a high capacity desert tank for your dirt bike. In total, they’re two, but you can practice the first option in two different ways that are ideal because you can actually merge the items with your dirt bike, on the plastic tail section of the bike or strapped to the bike.

Either way, you’re still good to go, but let get more into the details to see what actually happens. MSR fuel bottles are pretty much necessary, or should I say essential to use if you want to carry fuel safely, but also to easily store on a dirt bike.

You have a lot of choices on Amazon about MSR fuel bottles, and for the sake of the article, I’m going to point out the most popular option that most serious dirt bikers use. I don’t want to make this article seem like “it’s necessary for you to buy additional items”, because you have a lot of other solutions for this, like hooking up an auxiliary gas tank in the front part of the dirt bike, and so on.

Although, the methods that are included in this article are the most popular and safe ones that almost all dirt bike enthusiasts use, including myself. What I try to do in my blog is to only recommend gear, items, and accessories that I would feel comfortable using.

Fuel Bottles (RECOMMENDED: MSR Liquid Fuel Bottle)

The MSR Liquid Fuel Bottle is probably the most popular option on Amazon, as it is the most highly-rated fuel bottle in its category. People use this bottle in a lot of situations, for instance, I have also used this when I went camping with friends, it’s always good to have it in your backpack.

For more convenience, on Amazon, you can get this particular bottle in three different variants, which is great because you can always find the one that meets your preference the most. You can choose to get the 11-ounce model, the 20-ounce model, and the 30-ounce model, but what would work better in your case is a 30-ounce model.

The manufacturer is really proud of the title that they’ve given the bottle, a child-resistant fuel bottle that comes with a push-and-twist bottle caps design that is leak-proof. From my experience, everything that the company claims has turned out to be true.

The MSR Liquid Fuel Bottle is very practical, and it is made of a single piece of aluminum to prevent leaks, minimize fuel degradation(which helps a lot in your case), and handle pressurization required to operate liquid fuel stoves.

Moreover, to point out the important details, it can carry white gas, kerosene, diesel, automobile gas, mineral spirits, and aviation gas. The MSR Liquid Fuel Bottle would really make a great addition to you as a dirt bike rider, and as a method to carry extra fuel for your dirt bike.

Where To Store The Fuel Bottles?

Assuming that you’ve gotten yourself a fuel bottle, what’s the most decent place to actually store it, a spot that will not bother you as you ride your dirt bike. Well, there are mainly two options for that, and both of them are as practical and comfortable as it gets.

1. A Saddle Bag

A saddlebag would be ideal, and the chances are that you’re probably using a saddlebag right now, which is a plus for you. However, I am not really a believer of “expensive saddlebags”, so the option that I am recommending is rather a mid-range that shares almost the same qualities of those hefty ones.

The one that I am currently using is the Nelson-Rigg RG-020 Dual Sport Enduro. Yes, it takes some time to get used to that name, but all I can say is that it is a non-expensive saddle bag that gets the job done.

What got my attention the most when I first saw this model on Amazon was the fact that for the price, the Nelson-Rigg is water-resistant featuring Tri-Max Ballistic nylon construction with reflective piping and accent for nighttime visibility. Isn’t that just great? For this price range, this saddle bag clearly delivers much more value than most other expensive models out there.

In terms of storage, it has an expandable main compartment, a tool pouch/pocket under main compartment with external access, and reverse coil zipper that prevents dust and dirt from building up.
To not forget, it also has rubber-coated oversized zip puller for easy operation with gloves.

Why do I think this inexpensive saddle bag is great for holding your fuel bottle? Well, it securely mounts with heavy duty self-fastening straps and quick-release buckles with an anti-slip/scratch protective panel to keep the bottles intact.

2. Bottle Holster

No matter how inexpensive your saddlebag is, a bottle holster is the most budget-friendly option that you’re going to find. I get it, not everyone is willing to spend extra bucks on saddlebags, so there you have it, get yourself a bottle holster.

I haven’t really used a bottle holster to carry my extra fuel, but I have seen my friends do it. I’m really sure what models to recommend, because I wasn’t really interested in them, but you can find plenty of options available on Amazon. What’s the best part is that they all have an average price of $10 to $30.

Quality holsters come with plenty of attachments and straps, and such straps will make it easier for the holster to be attached to your dirt bike. So, when searching for bottle holsters, those are the things that you should look for.

Another option where you can store your bottle holster is just underneath the handlebars, or gas tanks, or anywhere else where it doesn’t get in your way.

High-Capacity Desert Gas Tanks

Most dirt bikes come with factory small gas tanks that have a capacity of only 2 gallons or less than that. Manufacturer’s practice this also with newer model dirt bike with only one simple goal in mind, to reduce the weight of the dirt bike as much as they can.

Unlike “manufacturer’s”, what enduro dirt bike riders do is switch the factory gas tanks with larger ones that can hold to up to 4 gallons. Now, assuming that you want to change your current gas tank with newer and more generous one, the option that I’d recommend is the Acerbis Fuel Tank.

Acerbis is a brand that you can trust since it has been producing innovative motorcycle related products for decades. This particular model provides additional fuel capacity while still providing slim ergonomics and sleek styling.

What really makes it stand out from the other gas tanks on the market is the impact- and abrasion-resistant construction with cross-linked polyethylene. This is the first option that comes to my mind when someone asked me what gas tank should I use for my dirt bike. It has served others well, and it will serve you well too.

How You Shouldn’t Carry Extra Fuel

There are a lot of ways that you can go wrong with this, and by “wrong” I mean resulting in a bad outcome for you, and for your dirt bike.

I have seen some videos on youtube where people are literally “wearing” the extra gas. That’s not something that you should do, and if you see someone doing it, convince him not to. If you think storing the extra fuel in your jacket, hip pack, waist pack or backpack is going to save you some extra bucks, you’re wrong, because you’re putting yourself in grave danger.

Those are the areas where the gas definitely doesn’t belong, because one tiny spark and you can end up in flames. Also, make sure you never store more fuel than you need. Try to calculate how many kilometers you’ll be driving, and store the exact amount of fuel that is necessary.

In case you’re using a normal or standard bottle, make sure that the container it leak-proof because that can have a pretty bad outcome. If you aren’t sure if the container seals the fuel completely or not, then just ignore using it because the risks are too great.

It’s always great if you store the fuel in specific made containers that are designed to seal leaks completely. If the container you’re using isn’t made for that purpose, you’re just putting yourself at risk, and fire is not something you want to play with.

Tip: “If you store more fuel than you need each time you go out for a ride, that fuel is most likely to go to waste if you leave it stored between rides in containers. Try to avoid doing that!